Radical Blackness!!!

What is radical Blackness?  Being bold, outspoken, and undeterred in pursuing the highest level of empowerment, advancement, and upliftment for our people.

Sound too lofty?

While looking online for some inspiration, I found a political science discourse summary:

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

POL 4S6. African American Political Thought

Dr. Floyd W. Hayes, III Office: LAEB 2254
Fall 1995
Office Hours: MWF1:00-3:00 P.M.,
MWF 11:30 A.M.12:20 P.M. or by appointment
BAFB 1254 Office Phone: 494-2785
Purdue University

Purpose of the Course

This course is designed to introduce students to African American political and social ideas. Through critical examination of some of the major expressions of that discourse, we hope to arrive at some understanding of the principles, goals, and strategies developed by African American women and men. The course will focus on major philosophical, theoretical, and ideological formulations put forward during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In light of the historic and contemporary problems associated with race, class, and gender oppression, we will probe carefully the manner in which these structures of domination and exploitation have differentially and similarly affected and infected black women and men. We also will study closely contrasts and similarities in the ideas put forward by African descended women and men in their monumental struggle for human rights in America. In this way, the course will highlight the critical significance of black feminist social and political thought.

Political thought is the practice of theoretical, philosophical, or ideological construction that attempts to say something meaningful about how individuals a n d groups organize and conduct their lives. It is an activity, a process, a conversation that situates the observing or theoretical self within an everyday life world that involves speculation and some separation from the ongoing processes of political life. In this view, political thought is that discourse concerned with the ways in which the human self relates to surrounding forms of cultural, economic, and political life.

Black political and social ideas reflect the attempt to construct an African American identity and community in response to historical and contemporary structures a n d processes of dehumanization, exploitation, and oppression where rugged individualism and the lust for power and private wealth have corrupted America’s national character, political culture, and institutional practice. These conditions also have influenced the thinking and behavior of African Americans and have established and reproduced systems of domination which African descended Americans continue the struggle to dismantle. Yet, as a result of the Atlantic slave trade and chattel slavery, which served to create a new people, African Americans are among America’s truly native populations. The often ambivalent condition of being African American simultaneously excluded from and included in the American political community provides the theme for this course: “Power, Interpretation, and Difference: Duality in African American Discourse.”

The rationale for this course is rooted in the necessity of every generation to grasp the character and dynamics of social development of earlier periods. For African Americans, the historic process of dehumanization, which set in motion their struggle for salvation and survival, continues to operate today. We study African American political and social discourse in order to understand the meaning of the African American experience. Further, in critically examining these ideas, we also probe the character and dynamics of the American social order its contradictions and dilemmas in regard to racial, gender, and class domination. Finally, the study o f African American political and social ideas encourages us to examine ourselves and our own perspectives about the inherent contradictions between cultural domination and social justice.

Well, I’d think for those who call themselves Nationalist; it’s a no-brainer.  However, for those who call for integration with our oppressor/enemy, this sounds to much like separation, and must be deterred.

You see, whenever Black people start projecting too much independence of the white mainstream and have the audacity to make their thoughts audible; it becomes a problem.  It’s all about control.  And that’s why whenever Black people become too vocal about the real problems in America; the oppressor will choose its handpicked co-conspirators who will talk against their own, in order to keep the status quo.

When will we see the radical Blackness we saw in the 1960’s?  When will it finally take precedent and become the norm?  Can it happen in America?

White America is scared of radical Blacks.  They act like someone who is fearful of too much of the truth exposing the game.  And it’s all about game.  But who is winning it?   How do we master it?

Are you bold enough to be RADICAL?

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25 comments on “Radical Blackness!!!

  1. Adeen says:

    You shouldn’t have let that stupid White troll on here! I get sick of stupid White trolls coming on Black websites that I comment on and I come on sites like here to escape Whites and Whiteness.

    Anyways I know I would be considered ”radical” because I don’t believe in integration with White people or intermarriage with White people because I know their true nature and the way they do things. I know I would be considered ”radical” because I believe Blacks should live apart from Whites and build their own communities. I know I would be considered ”radical” because I want Black people to know their true history not Eurocentric Whitewash nonsense in the history books. I know I would be considered ”radical” because I only want to marry a Black man and have full Black babies with him not the ”colorblind” mixed race utopia that AmeriKKKlan wants to promote to the current generation of Blacks.

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    • truthangel07 says:

      Adeen, that man exposed himself and I quickly checked him as you read my comments. He never responded to my last post, but I knew his game and it blew up in his face.

      I don’t go back and forth with white people who are simply too stupid and racist to realize how their behavior has impacted people of color. They only want you to believe their lies and when that doesn’t work; they will try to manipulate you into thinking they are not trying to harm or oppress anyone.

      Whatever…

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      • jamditis says:

        Which post did I not respond to?

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      • Adeen says:

        I know, it gets on my nerves when stupid White trolls like him come on here and other Black websites and blogs to distract the conversations and cause discord. I can’t stand White people at all and I come on here to escape them and the Eurocentric media and world.

        Honestly I love your blog, keep up the good work.

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    • jamditis says:

      I was simply ASKING QUESTIONS. I don’t know what else you would have me do. Seriously.

      Who was the first black man lynched?

      I don’t know.

      Please tell me.

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      • Adeen says:

        Why don’t you go away and get a life? I come on here to comment because I like this blog and I like the posts Truthangel07 writes. I am sick of albino devils coming on every Black blog or website and trying to distract the conversation and disrespect my race.

        I come on here to get away from evil, racist, pale faced demonic vultures like you!

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  2. See conflation is like a social disease. That’s what they do, they get you all turned around with their brand of bullshit, then walk away leaving you all flapping in the wind.

    Carry on sista, YOUR audience is listening.

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  3. jamditis says:

    “You first said that you were mixed. Now you’re calling yourself white? Thus, I can only assess that you’re passing. And that in and of itself is where this conversation ends. You’ve chosen to take on the appearance of the White person because deep down; you understand completely the advantage of having White Privilege.”

    I never said that I was mixed. In fact, if you go back and read what I actually said, you’ll find that my statements are quite similar to yours, with a few exceptions.

    You asked: “Are you white?”

    I replied (respectfully and non-confrontationally, I might add): “You are correct, I would pass for white in a heartbeat. In fact, I have even been told by people that I look their archetypal image of a ‘generic white male.’” Them I went on to add, “Although my family lineage can be traced back to Northern Egypt and Greece, then to the United States in the early 1900s when my family immigrated, I have and often do easily pass as white.”

    How you could have possibly taken offense to what I said, I do not know. But, in keeping with your (correct) assertion that “No White Person on this earth can understand The Black Experience,” I must once again assure you that I acknowledge and concede that you are quite right. As a white person I do not, and cannot, understand the Black experience.

    But I never attempted to camouflage or conceal my skin color – not once. In fact, my gravatar profile picture is an actual picture of me. So I can assure you that I do not mean to come off as a “White person or someone passing (in 2013) trying to camouflage the reality of being Black.” When it comes to this point you are undoubtedly mistaken, my friend.

    Moreover, I even explicitly stated that I only wanted to find a useful role for myself in the struggle “against oppression on the basis of ALLYSHIP AND SOLIDARITY – not benevolent salvation, as many whites tend to adopt.”

    Since I am white, and therefore incapable of reaching a valid conclusion on issues of race – due to my lack of understanding – I thought it would be more appropriate for me to ask someone else what they thought was the best way for me to (1) limit my own contributions to the continued racial oppression of people of color; and (2) figure out how best to combat racism in my everyday life. So, again, your claim that I am merely attempting to make “banal assertions of ‘being a champion’ of great causes of people of color,” is also mistaken.

    Then, you said:

    “Hence, it is very clear that skin color, as you have demonstrated, can be used to work to your advantage–in sharp contrast to Blacks where nature has marked them by their skin tone–and has been used as a negative by Whites to oppress them historically.”

    Again, no argument there. We even seem to be in perfect agreement. But then, you threw this in at the end:

    “Don’t ever come to my blog trying to bullshit me with double-talk as this.”

    If that is what you think I came here to do, then there is nothing I can do to change that – other than to ask you to reconsider my statements in a more genuine and less confrontational light. If you refuse, then I can only – with the utmost sincerity and deference – wish you the best of luck in your endeavors.

    I do hope, however, that someday – perhaps when you aren’t feeling so angry and spiteful – you might consider the words of W. E. B. Du Bois in his criticism of Booker T. Washington.

    He writes, “[While] it is a great truth to say that the Negro must strive and strive mightily to help himself, it is equally true that unless his striving be not simply seconded, but rather aroused and encouraged, by the initiative of the richer and wiser environing group, he cannot hope for great success. In his failure to realize and impress this last point, Mr. Washington is especially to be criticized. His doctrine has tended to make the whites, North and South, shift the burden of the Negro problem to the Negro’s shoulders and stand aside as critical and rather pessimistic spectators; when in fact the burden belongs to the nation, and the hands of none of us are clean if we bend not our energies to righting these great wrongs.”
    – Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk (1903), p. 46.

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    • Adeen says:

      Hey White trash, why are you on here? I come on here to read her articles, comment and escape White trash like you!

      I hate White trolls like you because you come here to distract the conversation and cause trouble.

      Like

      • jamditis says:

        Oh come on! I came here to do the same thing. How can you read my previous comments and think that I came here to mess around? I promise you I didn’t. All I wanted to know was what I can do to make sure I’m NOT contributing to racial oppression. That’s it.

        I didn’t come to the blog spouting racial slurs or trying to shoot down anything the author said. I wanted to know what they meant by the enemy, and how someone can achieve and maintain empowerment.

        If you don’t want to help me learn and understand how to be part of the solution, how can you possibly expect me to be anything else but another part of the problem?

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      • jamditis says:

        What conversation was I distracting?

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  4. jamditis says:

    Oh! When I originally read your post, I mistakenly assumed that you were saying that you had signed up to take the class. My mistake! The class does sound interesting, though. Good find.

    Also, I had a question about your statement, “…for those who call for integration with our oppressor/enemy, this sounds to much like separation and must be deterred.” Can you elaborate?

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    • truthangel07 says:

      I don’t believe becoming allies with an enemy that has a long history of oppression of your people makes any sense at all.

      Empowerment is freedom–and that is what Black people should be focused on.

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      • jamditis says:

        Interesting.

        First, I agree that capitulation to oppression and power makes one no better than the oppressors and the powerful. But I am still not clear on something. Can you define what you mean by ‘enemy’ more specifically?

        Secondly, how does someone achieve empowerment? And once they have it, how can they be sure to keep and maintain it?

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      • truthangel07 says:

        The enemy is White America, plain and simple. Let’s not be coy. America is racist from top to bottom–left to right. And why on earth would someone who has been oppressed by white racism, form coalitions with the very people that continue to oppress them, albeit covertly, as well as overtly? That is stupid.

        Empowerment means making oneself strong via through increasing the spiritual, political, social, educational, gender, or economic strength of individuals and communities.

        Clearly, one keeps empowerment when they realize who their true enemy is and and develop strategies that counter the negative tactics used against that group.

        It’s common sense.

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      • jamditis says:

        I think my confusion lies in your transition between references to White America as an institutional or systemic source of oppression; and your question “why on earth would someone who has been oppressed by white racism, form coalitions with the very people that continue to oppress them?”

        I don’t think anyone would consciously form an alliance or coalition with someone who continues to oppress them. Similarly, I don’t suspect that anyone would choose to ally themselves with “white racism” – or any form of racism, for that matter.

        What I’m saying is, it seems like you are implying that it would be unacceptable to work with any white person, even those who seek allyship and solidarity with the oppressed. My question is: Does the fact that they are white automatically render them ‘the enemy?’ Or do you consider the enemy to be anyone who continues to benefit from what David R. Roediger calls the “Wages of Whiteness”?

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      • truthangel07 says:

        Are you white?

        Who was the first Black many lynched?

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      • jamditis says:

        You are correct, I would pass for white in a heartbeat. In fact, I have even been told by people that I look their archetypal image of a ‘generic white male.’ Although my family lineage can be traced back to Northern Egypt and Greece, then to the United States in the early 1900s when my family immigrated, I have and often do easily pass as white.

        As to your second question: I’m positive, but I believe the first black person to be lynched was either John Billington in the 1630s or John Jenkins in 1851 – I can’t remember which. Technically, however, the term ‘lynching’ was only used after it became associated with James Lynch, a colonel from Virginia during the American Revolutionary War. Please correct me if I’m wrong, though.

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      • truthangel07 says:

        You did a Google search. You didn’t know off hand. And that is primarily the issue.

        White people love to join in association with causes because White people love to feel good about themselves not being racist–not consciously. But many White folks don’t know themselves like they think they do–it’s hardwired into even the nicest among them. Yes. There have been White people who joined Dr. Martin Luther King during the Civil Rights movement. And there were white people who fought to end slavery, however, look these same white folks in the eyes and demand that Whites pay reparations to All Black people; many would change as quickly as a chameleon can change its appearance.

        The bottom line: No White Person on this earth can understand The Black Experience.

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      • jamditis says:

        I am certainly not claiming to understand or identify with the experiences of black people. I can only identify with my own experience, of course. If you wish to get a better understanding of my own perspective on race relations, I would direct you to read some of my latest research on racial narratives in humor and comedy, here: http://www.academia.edu/3539690/White_Men_Cant_Joke_Racial_Hierarchy_and_Traditional_Race_Narratives_in_Humor_and_Comedy

        But, from my understanding of your statements here, you seem to be suggesting that I should simply give up, and live a life of inconsequence and obscurity. You seem to be asking me to stop benefiting from the color of my skin, and I don’t disagree with you on that point. But the reality is, I can only do so much in refusing to pass under the radar of the racial status quo – I certainly can’t be expected to be able make the NYPD stop and frisk me more often than other white people.

        At the same time, you seem to completely rule out the possibility of working against oppression on the basis allyship and solidarity – not benevolent salvation, as many whites tend to adopt. Your bottom line is undoubtedly correct. I cannot understand the black experience – at least not sufficiently. But if I’m forbidden from participating int he struggle, even after acknowledging my racially-limited understanding, I must say that I am confused as to what you would have me do instead.

        How can I – or any other white person, for that matter – possibly exist or act without offending at least one of those two precepts?

        It appears as if you wish me to create and live “between the veil” of a different nature.

        I’m simply asking for an alternative or acceptable explanation of my role – as a white male – in the struggle against oppression. If you are suggesting that I do not have such a role, then I must unfortunately – but respectfully, nonetheless – disagree with you.

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      • truthangel07 says:

        You first said that you were mixed. Now you’re calling yourself white? Thus, I can only assess that you’re passing. And that in and of itself is where this conversation ends. You’ve chosen to take on the appearance of the White person because deep down; you understand completely the advantage of having White Privilege.

        Your question of how, “as a white male” you find an alternative in the struggle of oppression is moot. Your behavior condemns the notion of that.

        It is obvious that you don’t have a role for to know the treatment of Black people; you’d know first hand how it felt when you were discriminated because of the color of your skin. Obviously you use your skin tone as a shield to deflect that type of harshness.

        This is why I will never tolerate any White person or someone passing (in 2013) trying to camouflage the reality of being Black with banal assertions of “being a champion” of great causes of people of color, yet using deception to hide the fact that you are also a person of color, albeit, with very light skin.

        Hence, it is very clear that skin color, as you have demonstrated, can be used to work to your advantage–in sharp contrast to Blacks where nature has marked them by their skin tone–and has been used as a negative by Whites to oppress them historically.

        Don’t ever come to my blog trying to bullshit me with double-talk as this.

        Like

      • truthangel07 says:

        I asked you WHO WAS THE FIRST BLACK MAN LYNCHED.

        John Billington was an Englishman.

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      • jamditis says:

        I’ve already conceded that I didn’t know the information you requested off the top of my head. I did indeed search the Internet to find the correct information.

        Your point is well received.

        Like

  5. jamditis says:

    I enjoy your passion and dedication. The discussion of power relations between the races is one that is heard. Unfortunately, the most common theme I hear being discussed is one of “cultural” differences, or one of different “traditions.” This conveniently allows white supremacy to flourish and retain its power, but under the assumption that certain aspects of our society are the way they are because whites and people of color simply have different cultures – rather than because whites have historically and systematically oppressed non-whites. Even the way we identify people implicitly as “white” or “non-white,” or as “whites” and “people of color” sustains – in its own way – an atmosphere or racial duality. This duality suggests, “There are white people, and then there are ‘other’ people.”

    If you haven’t already, I highly recommend the work of Joel Olson. Here’s a quote from page 61 of his book, “The Abolition of White Democracy”:

    “The ‘American Assumption’ (Du Bois’ term for the American Dream) accompanies the Blindspot. The Assumption that any ordinary person can become wealthy through hard work and thrift, Du Bois asserts, gave birth to a shallow definition of freedom limited to economic opportunity, the absence of government interference in private ventures, and the right to elect public officials. The Assumption presumes that the community is an obstacle to individual freedom rather than its conduit. So, for example, public assistance that does not appear to be ‘earned’ by the individual becomes a ‘handout’ indicating dependence rather than independence. By downplaying the structural aspects of economic failure, it resists any form of wealth distribution, whether it is forty acres and a mule, a welfare check, or the redistribution of opportunities through affirmative action. By embracing the Assumption and its negative conception of freedom, Du Bois argues, the labor movement encouraged poor whites to strive to become capitalists rather than challenge capitalist exploitation. In turn, ‘capitalists not only accepted universal suffrage but early discovered that high wages in America made even higher profits possible; and that this high standard of living was itself a protection for capital in that it made the more intelligent and best paid workers allies of capital and left its ultimate dictatorship undisturbed.’”

    Aside from Olson, there’s also Jeanette Covington of Rutgers University and her book “Crime and Racial Constructions: Cultural Misinformation About African Americans in Media and Academia.”

    Anyway, great post! Keep ’em coming! I hope your class goes well!

    Like

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