Missing R & B So Much…

greatest-rb-hits-1990s

During the nineties, you couldn’t turn on any radio station and not hear the latest hit from Black singers and groups.  Simply put, the music was stellar; even one-hit wonders went platinum.  Black music became the standard for contemporary music and the decade flourished.

Dance clubs were always filled and people were always excited to get the latest cut from their favorite artists.

Record stores flourished and so did the bank accounts of many record labels that promoted Black music.

Remember groups like, Jodeci, Boyz II Men, Dru Hill, Tony, Toni, Tone’, Mint Condition, Bell Biv Devoe, Shai, H-town, Hi-Five, Next, Silk, Troop, After 7, Soul II Soul, Jagged Edge, and the great females that complimented the male groups: TLC, Brownstone, EnVogue, SWV, Total, Jade, Blaque, Allure, and the all too numerous one-hit wonders, you never got bored listening to the music.  There was always somebody ready to blow up.  As in Janet Jackson, Aaliyah, Mary J. Blige, Toni Braxton, R. Kelly, Usher, just to name a few.

But then, by the end of the decade, things started to change.

For one thing, the music changed. Today’s version of chart-topping R&B, hijacked by techno-club production, overdubbed vocals and hip-hop cadence, has sparked a fierce debate about the state of popular soul music. So which came first: the demise of the singing soul group or the deterioration of R&B music?

One of the parallels one can make here is that traditionally, R & B singers and groups got their start in the church, going all the way back to the 50’s, this tradition introduced many great singers and exposed a tremendous array of talent that was in the Black community.

Today, many Black artists can barely hit a note. Don’t even think about putting them onstage with legends like Aretha Franklin.

Whatever the case, music is dead today.

And I do believe that it’s because of the lack of quality Black music that has made many record listeners and buyers turn away from music all together.

We need a change.

 

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15 comments on “Missing R & B So Much…

  1. AREAL says:

    I agree rnb music have shifted the last decades it went from Mary j blige natural soulful voice singing live anytime any where to lip syncing girls like Tamar what happened to music that touch yo soul and made you break the repeat button!!

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    • truthangel07 says:

      Many people forget that the Black singers of past generations were vocally trained in the Black church choir. Not many of today’s singers come from that background and it really has changed what we hear on the radio/playlists.

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      • AREAL says:

        Fasho church’s are the catalyst of becoming a dammn good soul singer without that background these singers lack in very important areas…also the generation rather stay in clubs than churches. You know the world changing.

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      • truthangel07 says:

        Very much so.

        Having grown up in the church, and singing in the choir–you just can’t get any better discipline.

        That powerful singing is a gift from God and Sunday mornings were like Showtime at the Apollo for many in the Black community.

        Miss those days…

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      • AREAL says:

        You ain’t lying! singing in those Apollo churches lol and sunshine bands u killed every week n sometimes choir rehearsal be the best times!!(love this topic)

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      • truthangel07 says:

        Oh, choir rehearsal. Twice a week for me. And those tough choir directors. Lawd!

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      • AREAL says:

        Man those choir directors made u wanna perfect every single note!!! Love mines to death!!

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      • truthangel07 says:

        One Sunday, my choir got yelled at by our then choir director (Kevin) because some folks thought they could skip rehearsal, then come to church on Sunday, mess up notes, and get away with it. He wasn’t having it.

        You should have seen the look on the congregation’s faces…I wish we had smartphones back then.

        It was priceless…

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      • AREAL says:

        Sounds loke y choir director Sherri!! She wouldn’t let u sing or sot with the choir if you wasn’t at rehearsal lol made me grounded in that church!! Lobe singing gospel babay

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      • truthangel07 says:

        My choir director, Debbie actually would make you sing by yourself at rehearsal if she heard an off note.

        Lawd!

        That was discipline…

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  2. I know what you mean. That soulful quality that was the rule back in the day, that’s not what comes down the pike today. The few R&B singers that are still around, there is no comparison to the old school mix and that is why I treasure my collection of the oldies.

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    • truthangel07 says:

      Oldies is all I’ve been listening too. And girl! You’re in luck. Do you remember the group, Guy? Now that was a good group that should have been great.

      I’ve bought everything they ever put out.

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  3. Ms. says:

    The market was saturated. And “black” artists/companies cashed out just before the industry changed direction. Music is a reflection of the mood of the people. Because American music is “our” music, saying it is dead today is to say we* are dead. If “we” are not dead, then it is not music. I listen to foreign music and Oldskool, waiting for my people to be resurrected.

    *actual Americans

    Do you not give an email or want people to write? Otherwise I will stop posting…

    Like

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